Monthly Archives: December 2009

Quarters

Photography is a two-part process.

In the days of film, there was negative making (“shooting”) and printmaking (“printing”). With digital, nothing has changed, the image is captured/created, then processed into a final product.

This means that sometimes you can find an old image you weren’t fond of and re-imagine the processing to get something you do. This was shot on Ilford FP4+, scanned as a negative, and processed digitally. Call it whatever you want, but it’s just stage one from one process and stage two from the other.

Pentax K1000, Ilford FP4+ in Clayton F76+.

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Filed under Black and White, Film, Self-Developed, Street Photography, Uncategorized

Negative

Who needs action when you (got) words?

Since I’m busy with exams, grading, and other fun things (almost done the hundreds of assignments covering my desk in various piles- I am too disorganized for this), my plan to start shooting more has yet to come to fruition. I have, however, found some neat things to post. Well, mostly this. I tried a bunch of double exposures on my K1000, which is a little tricky because the film tends to advance just a little if you don’t get it perfectly. When you’re not perfect with multiple multiple exposures in a row, you end up with long strips of various overlapping exposures. It’s a neat effect, but it isn’t particularly useful, at least not for anything I’ve found.

This is color negative (C-41 process) film developed in black and white chemicals. It’s a strange cross-process, but one I had some fun with last year. If you like it, here are some links to a few more shots using this processing:

Revolution I

Full Clip

Ian Curtis

Suspicion

Note: Some of these have been effected by the formatting change in the blog, and are covered by the sidebar. I’m sorry about this. If you’d really like to see any of them, I could give you a better link.

A.

Pentax K1000 on some sort of expired C-41 film (probably either Superia 400 or Gold 200) developed black and white in Clayton F76+ and scanned on an Epson flatbed.

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Filed under Uncategorized