Tag Archives: Urban

Sonny Wortzik

Another from the “abandoned quarry,” which is apparently not at all abandoned.

Films aren’t “filmed,” they’re “photographed.” Early filmmakers drew heavily from the work of early photographers (particularly in the area of very careful composition, as any of the Lumiere brothers’ films will show you). I think some of my work is heavily infuenced by my favorite American films of the 1970s (Taxi Driver, The Warriors), particularly in their warm color tones and their persistent examination of the aesthetic decay of the American metropolis (typically, and in both of those cases, New York). When I watch a good film, I find myself constantly noticing things I could try to recreate or reinterpret in a photograph (and my criteria for what makes a “good” film have a lot to do with its aesthetic merits). To me, this instantly recalls the supersaturated tones and visual metaphor of Rear Window, though that film is neither urban nor from the 1970s.

Nikon D200, Nikkor 35mm f/1.8.

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Filed under Abstract, Digital

Dinosaur III

continental

Philadelphia, PA.

Pentax digital setup.

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Filed under Black and White, Digital, Street Photography

Reading (Take II)

book-boy-x-pro-4

Photography is often false.

Look familiar? It might. I’ve been dreaming of a Holga lately, so I decided to go for the effect. I do like this presentation quite a bit better than the first go with this one- the crop minimizes the barrel distortion from the horrible lens on the Nikon I had borrowed at the time. On the other hand, I did have to give up the sky to do so, which I rather liked. Actually, on second thought, the original is fairly toy camera-like in itself. I guess that’s a pretty horrendous lens, because the Nikon N75 is no Diana (although not an especially high-end SLR body from its time, and certainly far from my favorite).

Plug related to this post: For those of you in the area, the Met has an excellent special exhibition going called “Reality Check: Truth and Illusion in Modern Photography.” I had the opportunity to see it the day before Thanksgiving, and despite my fever-induced deliriousness (102 is quite a fever for someone who normally runs 96s), I was very impressed. Great museum and a great exhibition.

I guess the results here are the combination of a few factors: Expired film, horrendous optical quality (cheap glass wide open at wide end), a low-quality scan, and the processing liberties taken by yours truly. I like it, and I think it captures the feel of the place quite a bit better. The rest of you can judge for yourselves.

Expired Fuji NPS 160, C-41 processing, world’s worst zoom lens (some sort of Quantaray abomination), liberal embellishing.

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Filed under Color, Film, Street Photography

Slam


Photography is complicated.

Tonight: Action shooting with on-camera hotshoe flash (my only option for various reasons). To capture the shot I had in my mind (which I didn’t), I needed to consider perspective, how that perspective is altered or distorted by focal length and proximity to the subject, how to get correct exposure using a non-compatible TTL flash, how to get correct focus, and how not to get landed on. I succeeded in precisely two of these areas.

The moral of the story is, every time you think it’s down to a reflex, there’s one more thing you aren’t thinking of. Especially if you’re me. And especially if it’s dark out.

Pentax digital, some sort of Nikon-intended Quantaray strobe that isn’t worth the effort it took to acquire for free.

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Filed under Black and White, Digital, Street Photography